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Community: Forum: Vegetarian Discussion

Vegetarian Discussion - All Things Veg*n Forum

Cows are sold as "broken mouth" here if they are missing a tooth, or the incisors are very short, or the incisors are totally gone.
Risk takers then bid on these BM cows based on their body condition and the width of their muzzle. Often they are bred cows that have been trucked east from the Dakotas.

I have started to mouth some of my cows and was amazed to find cows in good body condition with out incisors at all. Is this some what common, or is mostly due to your pasture grass quality ? Is it safe to assume these gummers are over 12 years old, or ?

Responses (3)

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by happycowgirl at 02/07/16 23:39:25

    hi Jhon,
    We'll need a lot more information to respond to that post. Do you realize this is a vegetarian website?

    In my dreams, I'm hoping you run a sanctuary for these poor broken mouth cows. But it sounds like you may be a rancher. In any event, I had no idea "broken mouth" cows were so common, yet I suppose considering all the other unthinkable ways cows suffer and die, I shouldn't be shocked to hear this. While the thought of these beautiful creatures suffering in any way causes me pain, your post has been educational for me nonetheless.

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by ahimsa32fa at 02/08/16 05:17:19

    Howard Lyman's 1998 book, "Mad Cowboy" should be required reading at all agricultural schools (and all high schools), but that will never happen.

    His story, - going from wealthy cattle rancher to vegan - is a great read...as is the later story of the Texas cattlemen suing him and Oprah for speaking ill of the cattle industry on TV.

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by anahidscv at 02/08/16 13:39:53

    Hi Ahimsa32fa, I did read that book, its excellent. To happycowgirl. Not sure if you are on the right forum. Are you a rancher or have a sanctuary? This is a vegetarian/vegan forum.

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