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From Howard Lyman - http://www.madcowboy.com/02_Book_First3.000.html

The city of Los Angeles alone, for example, sends some two hundred tons of euthanized cats and dogs to a rendering plant every month. Added to the blend are the euthanized catch of animal control agencies, and roadkill. (Roadkill is not collected daily, and in the summer, the better roadkill collection crews can generally smell it before they can see it.) When the gruesome mix is ground and steam-cooked, the lighter, fatty material floating to the top gets refined for use in such products as cosmetics, lubricants, soaps, candles, and waxes. The heavier protein material is dried and pulverized into a brown powder, about a quarter of which consists of fecal material. The powder is used as an additive to almost all pet food as well as to livestock feed. Farmers call it 'protein concentrates'. In 1995, five million tons of processed slaughterhouse leftovers were sold for animal feed in the United States. I used to feed tons of the stuff to my own livestock. It never concerned me that I was feeding cattle to cattle.

In August 1997, in response to growing concern about the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or Mad Cow disease), the FDA issued a new regulation that bans the feeding of ruminant protein (protein from cud-chewing animals) to ruminants; therefore, to the extent that the regulation is actually enforced, cattle are no longer quite the cannibals that we had made them into. They are no longer eating solid parts of other cattle, or sheep, or goats. They still munch, however, on ground-up dead horses, dogs, cats, pigs, chickens, and turkeys, as well as blood and fecal matter of their own species and that of chickens. About 75 percent of the ninety million beef cattle in America are routinely given feed that has been 'enriched' with rendered animal parts. The use of animal excrement in feed is common as well, as livestock operators have found it to be an efficient way of disposing of a portion of the 1.6 million tons of livestock wastes generated annually by their industry. In Arkansas, for example, the average farm feeds over fifty tons of chicken litter to cattle every year. One Arkansas cattle farmer was quoted in U.S. News & World Report as having recently purchased 745 tons of litter collected from the floors of local chicken-raising operations. After mixing it with small amounts of soybean bran, he then feeds it to his eight hundred head of cattle, making them, in his words, 'fat as butterballs'. He explained, 'If I didn't have chicken litter, I'd have to sell half my herd. Other feeds are too expensive.' If you are a meat-eater, understand that this is the food of your food.

We don't know all there is to know about the extent to which the consumption of diseased or unhealthy animals causes diseases in humans, but we do know that some diseases (rabies, for example) are transmitted from the host animal to humans. We know that the common food poisonings brought on by such organisms as the prevalent E. Coli bacteria, which results from fecal contamination of food, causes the death of nine thousand Americans a year and that about 80 percent of food poisonings come from tainted meat. And now we can also be virtually certain, from the tragedy that has already afflicted Britain, that Mad Cow disease can 'jump species' and give rise to a new variant of the always fatal, brain-wasting Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.


Responses (4)

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by JohnnySensible at 09/13/08 01:30:16


  • Report Abuse

    Posted by JohnnySensible at 09/13/08 02:27:19

    Tell this to any friends who still ingest dairy!

    ............................................................

    http://www.commondreams.org/headlines04/0128-03.htm

    Published on Wednesday, January 28, 2004 by the Seattle Post-Intelligencer

    Cattle Feed is Often a Sum of Animal Parts
    And Because of That, New Limits Don't Go Far Enough, Say Activists

    by Lewis Kamb

    Excerpts -

    ............................................................

    Ranchers found that grain rations mixed with proteins could help fatten and muscle out herds more quickly, and in turn, bring mature livestock to market much faster, Lyman said.

    And, in farming communities, a variety of protein sources were readily available, from soybeans or peanuts or cottonseed. Or, from chicken feces, poultry feathers, cow blood or other parts of pigs, horses, fish, cattle and just about any animal part unfit for human consumption.

    "These days, anytime you find an animal raised in a factory feedlot setting, they're all eating rendered animal parts." Lyman said. "I was told this was the new modern way to do it. I bought into it hook, line and sinker. And I was wrong."

    ............................................................

    Cows are still allowed to eat feeds that can include parts of pigs, fish, chicken, horses, even cats or dogs. And some of those animals -- before being rendered and mixed up for cattle feed -- are raised on food containing the same cow parts now banned from cattle consumption.

    And cattle can continue to consume pig and horse blood for protein, as well as tallow, a hard fat from rendered cattle parts, as a fattening source.

    From 2004

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


    Economic Impacts of Feed-Related Regulatory Responses to Bovine Spongiform
    Encephalopathy

    Kenneth H. Mathews, Jr.

    http://www.ers.usda.gov/Publications/LDP/2008/08Aug/LDPM17001/ldpm17001.pdf

    Excerpt -

    In the United States, most protein in cattle rations is fed to lactating dairy cows and cattle being fattened in feedlots during the final few months prior to slaughter. Dairy cows and calves account for most of the 70 percent of blood meal used by ruminants (Sparks, 2001).

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    http://www.uky.edu/Ag/AnimalSciences/pubs/asc136.pdf


    Using Byproducts to Feed Dairy Cattle by Donna M. Amaral-Phillips and R.. W. Hemken

    Excerpts -

    Blood Meal
    1. Byproduct of the rendering industry.
    2. Made from clean, fresh animal blood exclusive of
    the urine, hair, stomach contents, etc.
    3. Flash drying process produces a more uniform
    product with a higher lysine content.
    4. Due to potential palatability problems, best used in
    total mixed rations (TMR). Needs to be added slowly
    over a two-week period. Palatability problems may be
    encountered if added to grain mixes fed in the parlor or
    through a computer feeder.
    5. Limit intake to 0.5-1.0 lbs/cow/day in total mixed
    rations.

    Fish Meal
    1. Made from clean, dried, ground, and
    undecomposed fish.
    2. Rich in essential amino acids. The amino acid
    profile may be similar to that required for the synthesis
    of milk protein.
    3. Due to potential palatability problems, best used in
    total mixed rations. Needs to be added slowly over a
    two-week period. Problems may be encountered if
    added to grain mixes fed in the parlor or through a
    computer feeder.

    Meat Meal
    1. A rendered product from the carcasses of mammals
    excluding blood, hair, hoof, hide trimmings, feces,
    stomach, and rumen contents. Similar to meat and
    bone meal except no minimum phosphorus
    concentration required.
    2. Due to potential palatability problems, best used in
    total mixed rations. Needs to be added slowly over a
    two-week period. Problems may be encountered if
    added to grain mixes fed in the parlor or through a
    computer feeder.
    3. Limit intake to 1.5-2.5 lbs/cow/day in total mixed
    rations.

    Meat and Bone Meal
    1. A rendered product from the carcass of mammals
    excluding blood, hair, hoof, hide trimmings, feces,
    stomach, and rumen contents. It contains a minimum
    of 4% phosphorus with a calcium content that does not
    exceed 2.2 times the phosphorus concentration.
    2. Due to potential palatability problems, best used in
    total mixed rations. Needs to be added slowly over a
    two-week period. Palatability problems may be
    encountered if added to grain mixes fed in the parlor or
    through a computer feeder.
    3. Limit intake to 1.5-2.5 lbs/cow/day in total mixed
    rations.

    Yellow Grease
    1. Byproduct derived from grease used in the
    restaurant industry.
    2. Best used in feedlot rations rather than rations for
    lactating dairy cows.

    Tallow
    1. Derived primarily from rendered beef fat but may
    include other animal fats.
    2. Requires special handling equipment because at
    room temperature it is a solid or semi-solid. To be
    mixed within feed, it must be heated so that it can be
    melted.
    3. Nine different grades of tallow are sold. Good
    quality (fancy bleachable) tallow should be used for the
    most consistent animal response.
    4. Limit to 1 lb/1200 lb cow/day.

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by JohnnySensible at 09/13/08 07:06:06

    Watch Howard Lyman for an hour plus - video link - "road-kill" & "supporting the cancer industry" - http://www.archive.org/details/OrganicAthlete_2006_09_31_Howard_Lyman

  • Report Abuse

    Posted by AndyT at 07/01/10 06:04:36

    Yuk!

    Thanks for sharing.

    Best regards,
    Andy

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