Join the conversation

Questionnaire

lily96
Posted by lily96 at 07/08/2013

Hi my name is Lily, I have been a vegetarian since birth and went Vegan for a short period of time so do have an idea of the diet and foods but am now back to vegetarianism. I am doing a research project in my final year at school in my Food Nutrition class and have chosen to do a project on Veganism. Some marks are given for research conducted and therefore I have written a questionnaire however I dont know any vegans to ask! So I would really appreciate it if a few people would be able to take the time to complete the questionnaire for me in order to widen my knowledge! Thanks in advance xx

1)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled vegan products available in supermarkets?

2)Do you know of any brands/ranges in the super markets which are specifically making all vegan products or focus on vegan dietary needs?

3)If yes, please specify:

4)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products which use organic ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?

5)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products using local ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?

6)When buying a ready-made product from the supermarket, on a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being most important) how importantly do you take into consideration the provenance of the ingredients such as organic, local or Fair Trade?

7)What kind of attributes would you specifically look for in a ‘luxury’ or ‘indulgent’ food product?

8) As a vegan, do you find it easy to get a wide variety of different protein sources?

9)As a vegan, what are your typical calcium sources?

10)For what reasons did you decide to follow a vegan diet?

Responses

DC1346
DC134607/08/2013 19:53:36
1)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled vegan products available in supermarkets?

Answer: Zero. I live in rural Arizona. My community has 3 supermarkets and a Wal-Mart. Only one has a vegan, gluten free section … but it’s tucked away in the corner of a health food section and is NOT labeled.

2)Do you know of any brands/ranges in the super markets which are specifically making all vegan products or focus on vegan dietary needs?

Answer: I know of one – Gardenburger … and only because of the ads they’ve been running on TV.

3)If yes, please specify: (See above)

4)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products which use organic ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?

Answer: Two … and only in the produce section … usually baby carrots, grapes, and sometimes tomatoes and lettuce.

5)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products using local ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?

Answer: One … and coincidentally only one of the local supermarkets sells locally grown corn. The funny thing is that we have a pecan orchard outside town … and I’ve never seen them sold locally in any of our supermarkets.

6)When buying a ready-made product from the supermarket, on a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being most important) how importantly do you take into consideration the provenance of the ingredients such as organic, local or Fair Trade?

Answer: Zero. I really don’t pay attention to labels. Manufacturers use labels all the time as a sales gimmick. Case in point. Boca Burger says an “Original Vegan” burger but if you look at the list of ingredients, it includes whey which is the residue leftover from milk when making cheese.

Before I became a vegan, I used to eat organic free range chicken. I loved the name “free range” and envisioned happy chickens wandering around a farmer’s expansive fenced yard instead of being locked up in a coop. As it turns out, the legal definition simply requires that free range chickens must have access to “the outside.” By law, “outside,” could simply be a fenced in concrete pad.

Organic free range “natural” chicken also conjures up images of chickens running around free. By law, the legal definition of “natural” has nothing to do with how chickens are raised. It simply means that nothing was added to the carcass.

7)What kind of attributes would you specifically look for in a ‘luxury’ or ‘indulgent’ food product?

Answer: To me, luxury products use the best possible ingredients and are made to order from scratch in small batches. There are exceptions. For example, I use an imported Italian white truffle oil when I make a vegan “cream” of mushroom soup. I consider this to be a luxury product.

8) As a vegan, do you find it easy to get a wide variety of different protein sources?

Yes – but only because I’m a trained chef and Culinary Arts teacher. I’m also a vegan cookbook author and am writing a series called The Unintentional Vegan which is available through Amazon as an e-book.

My specialty has been to produce vegan version recipes of popular comfort foods. I use all sorts of products as meat substitutes … textured vegetable protein, TVP and gluten baked as a jerky, bean curd, dried bean curd (which has a jerky like texture), legumes, nuts, seeds, and grains like quinoa. I’ve even come up with a recipe for a key lime smoothie that’s made with spirulina.

9)As a vegan, what are your typical calcium sources?

Answer: Collard greens, turnip greens, blackberries, dried apricots, figs, oranges, organic orange concentrate, fortified non-dairy milk, hummus (made with Great Northern beans) , soybeans, and kale.

10) For what reasons did you decide to follow a vegan diet?

My answer is in 2 parts.

A) I never intended to become a vegan. An ovo-lacto vegetarian friend asked me to create some low fat, low cholesterol recipes for her. I immediately thought vegan and since I didn’t want to waste food, I began eating everything I made.

I started out simple and created a recipe for vegan meatballs and meatloaf that hold up well to sauces and gravies. From there I began creating dishes such as Beef Bourguignon, stew, and Cornish pasties using seitan. I’ve made a vegan fish using sweet potatoes, rice flour, and various seasonings. I’ve made a vegan Italian sausage that’s absolutely delicious that I’ll eat it plain without a sauce or gravy.

In time I noticed that I didn’t miss meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, or granulated white sugar. So long as I had access to vegan friendly versions of my favorite foods, I didn’t mind being a vegan. I had become an unintentional vegan, hence the title of my series: The Unintentional Vegan.

B) I love animals. I’ve always loved animals but since I wasn’t raised vegetarian, I differentiated between pets and food. This was wrong.

I started changing my attitude after returning stateside after 8 consecutive years in the Middle East. I was a civilian (teacher) in Saudi Arabia during the First Gulf War when Iraqi scud missiles were hitting my community. I was a volunteer baker at Khobar Towers, a U.S. military base in Saudi Arabia that was hit by terrorists. I was also in Beirut when the Israeli Air Force bombed the city.

When I returned stateside, I had problems with post-traumatic stress. I developed a sleep disorder and had problems with depression and flashbacks. A doctor told me that this happened because I let my mental safeguards down thinking that I was safe simply because I was living in the States. I subsequently developed problems. Part of my therapy involved getting a pet. I brought two Manx mix kittens (brothers) home from the Humane Society. I gave these cats a home but they gave me peace of mind. During the year that I took off work to readjust to living in the states, these cats gave me a reason to get up. Since I’m a bachelor, they also made me care about someone else when I didn’t much care about myself.

In later years, I rescued a kitten who had literally been abandoned on the sidewalk by some putz in a pickup who literally dropped 7 kittens on the sidewalk. I was only able to recover one. I meant to turn this kitten over to the Humane Society … but he has now been with me for 9 years.

My last kitty was rescued from the local county kill shelter. I went to the county shelter with a friend who was looking for a dog. While she was looking at dogs, I looked at cats. I found Princess Tabitha. She was on the red alert list meaning that if she wasn’t adopted, she’d be put down. My friend wound up not getting a dog but I came home with another cat.

In addition to my cats, I have a 5,000 gallon fresh water pond with two attached bog gardens. The pond is home to four koi who I rescued from a plant nursery that was going out of business. The koi were living in a child’s wading pool. They didn’t have proper water filtration and since they were the length of my arm from shoulder to extended fingertips, the wading pool was overcrowed.

The manager wanted $100 per fish. I gave him $100 for all 4 and brought them home. The fish spent two years hiding under frogbits. Frogbits look like mini-lily pads … but little by little, they’ve gotten used to the pond.

On hot summer days when I climb into the 4 foot depth under the overhanging shade of a mesquite tree, the fish come out to visit. I’ve come to regard the fish as my friends. They’re still pretty reclusive but it’s nice to see them swimming out and about the rest of the pond instead of hiding.

It’s taken me a long time, but I’ve come to realize that the fish and the cats all have distinct personalities. I regard them as friends and if these creatures are friends, what does this say about other living creatures?

There’s an old quote that goes, “Strangers are friends that we haven’t met.”

If this is true, how could I possibly eat a potential friend … and as I said, I really don’t miss eating meat.
lily96
lily9607/12/2013 02:37:14
Thanks so much for this, Im really grateful! All the best with your books! My coursework project is a lot like what you are doing with creating vegan versions of popular foods!
Kaari
Kaari07/14/2013 04:48:37
1)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled vegan products available in supermarkets?
2. It’s becoming more common to see a vegetarian label on foods, but not a vegan label. I have only seen a few products with a vegan label.

2)Do you know of any brands/ranges in the super markets which are specifically making all vegan products or focus on vegan dietary needs?
No.

3)If yes, please specify:

4)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products which use organic ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?
9. If you aren’t misled by simple marketing language, it pretty clear which products are organic and fair-trade an which aren’t. I’m glad to see that more supermarkets offer a wider range of these products, especially in the whole-food section.

5)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products using local ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?
2. The amount of produce that is presented as local is very minimal. Mostly dairy products are marketed as local (Dutch), but those claims aren’t of any value. I have seen a growing number of vegetables being presented as coming from nearby farmers, but I’ve only seen one supermarket doing that.

6)When buying a ready-made product from the supermarket, on a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being most important) how importantly do you take into consideration the provenance of the ingredients such as organic, local or Fair Trade?
I hardly by any ready-made products, if I do I make sure they are organic. There aren’t as many local or fair trade products available as there are organic. Often the ones that are fair-trade are organic as well though.

7)What kind of attributes would you specifically look for in a ‘luxury’ or ‘indulgent’ food product?
I don’t know, I’m not sure what you’re looking for here.

8) As a vegan, do you find it easy to get a wide variety of different protein sources?
Yes.

9)As a vegan, what are your typical calcium sources?
Sesame seeds, green leafy vegetables, homemade hummus and some tofu once in a while, to name a few. The only good calcium sources are from plant foods anyway, vegetarians and others should be getting them from the same sources as a vegan.

10)For what reasons did you decide to follow a vegan diet?
For the animals, my health and for the environment. A vegan diet is the only sustainable diet.

Good luck with your research project :)
LauraJones
LauraJones07/14/2013 17:49:10
1)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled vegan products available in supermarkets?
5

2)Do you know of any brands/ranges in the super markets which are specifically making all vegan products or focus on vegan dietary needs?
Yes

3)If yes, please specify: Burt's Bees, Hugo Natural's, Cheecha puffs, Rice works, et al.

4)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products which use organic ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?
7

5)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products using local ingredients/produce available in supermarkets?
3

6)When buying a ready-made product from the supermarket, on a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being most important) how importantly do you take into consideration the provenance of the ingredients such as organic, local or Fair Trade?
10

7)What kind of attributes would you specifically look for in a ‘luxury’ or ‘indulgent’ food product?
Sweet, not very healthy foods, expensive or exotic foods.

8) As a vegan, do you find it easy to get a wide variety of different protein sources?
Definitely

9)As a vegan, what are your typical calcium sources?
Calcium is in nuts and seeds, fruits and veggies, grains, fats, legumes and soy foods. As long as you get a wide variety of foods you should get enough calcium. Many people prefer fortified soy products/plant-based animal alternatives for calcium, but the best place to find it is in legumes and soy foods (peanuts are a legume!)

10)For what reasons did you decide to follow a vegan diet?
I don't support Big Ag, treatment of animals, the effect on the environment, personal health (I'm genetically prone to kidney disease), and the wonderful people you meet! Ahimsa.
cbg_37
cbg_3707/22/2013 16:34:58
1)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled vegan products available in supermarkets? 2

2)Do you know of any brands/ranges in the super markets which are specifically making all vegan products or focus on vegan dietary needs? yes

3)If yes, please specify: morningstar, boca, amy's (though, i think that's veg)

4)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products which use organic ingredients/produce available in supermarkets? 8

5)On a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being very obvious) how often do you see/find clearly labelled products using local ingredients/produce available in supermarkets? 6

6)When buying a ready-made product from the supermarket, on a scale of zero to ten (0 being not at all, 10 being most important) how importantly do you take into consideration the provenance of the ingredients such as organic, local or Fair Trade? 7

7)What kind of attributes would you specifically look for in a ‘luxury’ or ‘indulgent’ food product? mouthfeel, satisfaction

8) As a vegan, do you find it easy to get a wide variety of different protein sources? no

9)As a vegan, what are your typical calcium sources? vitamins

10)For what reasons did you decide to follow a vegan diet? ethics

You need to be logged in or registered to post.