Vegan Thanksgiving: The turkeys are free. ……but not the vegetables!

Albert Levering (1869-1929); The Vegetarian’s Thanksgiving; Cover illustration for Life v. 38 no. 995 (November 28, 1901) (1)

Albert Levering (1869-1929); The Vegetarian’s Thanksgiving; Cover illustration for Life v. 38 no. 995 (November 28, 1901) (1)

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Thanksgiving Silliness – 1901 Life magazine(2)

~ ……a man and a turkey seated at their dinner table with napkins tied around their necks. Their dinner, on the table and being served, is exclusively cooked vegetables. Levering has created some wonderful details in this illustration. The lower border decoration is anthropomorphic with weeping vegetables (both canned and fresh) interspersed with happily dancing turkeys…… ~ (3)

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~ Happy Vegan Thanksgiving 2013 to turkeys & all other creatures. ~

The Ernest Bell Library has a fine & growing collection of: –

‘art created by humans – primarily for the benefit of animals’. 

If anyone would like to help by either Adopting or Sponsoring items please be in touch.

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Notes
(1) Albert Levering’s Thanksgiving illustration for Life from 1901 shows a man and a turkey seated at their dinner table with napkins tied around their necks. Their dinner, on the table and being served, is exclusively cooked vegetables. Levering has created some wonderful details in this illustration. The lower border decoration is anthropomorphic with weeping vegetables (both canned and fresh) interspersed with happily dancing turkeys and an outer edge to the border of raised forks. In the illustration proper, two of the dinner plates have a border design that appears to be cauliflower florets. In 1896 Massachusetts’ Dedham Pottery opened making white-glazed pottery and plates that initially had a decorative border in cobalt blue of crouching rabbits circling the edge. Eventually the decorations included a variety of other animals such as turtles, elephants, and chicks. Levering’s twist on Dedham Pottery designs is to make the border vegetable instead of animal. The last humorous detail may be seen on hanging on the far wall. In the illustration you can see a picture of a tree stump with a hatchet buried in it, referring to the normally contentious behavior between man and turkey that typifies Thanksgiving Day. – more here -http://www.rockwell-center.org/exploring-illustration/sympathy-for-the-turkey/
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Life magazine was founded in 1883, in New York . It was a partnership between John Ames Mitchell and Andrew Miller.

John Ames Mitchell  (1844–1918) was a humanitarian.

He adored children.

He was an opponent of the crude immunizations of his era.

He was a hygeinist, believing that good sanitation was always the best medicine, cure and preventative.

He was a staunch anti-vivisectionist long before that became the well known cause it is today.

Was he a vegetarian or vegan? – we have not yet found out.

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Andrew Miller was an avid horse racer – so we will say no more about him.

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John Ames Mitchell – Cherubs and Life 
Publisher, architect, artist, novelist, mystic, mystery: John Ames Mitchell was a Renaissance man who kept to himself but influenced many. A Harvard educated architect who studied at the Ecole Des Beaux Arts in Paris, Mr. Mitchell founded the original Life magazine in 1883. Much more like today’s New Yorker than the Life of the later 20th Century, Mitchell’s magazine discovered and encouraged many fine writers and artists at the turn of the 20th Century, such as Charles Dana Gibson, the illustrator who created the Gibson Girl. It covered the literary scene as well as political and social issues. He and Horace Greeley of The New York Herald Tribune founded the Fresh Air Fund, which for many years operated the Life Fresh Air camp for city kids on the site of today’s Branchville School. Mr. Mitchell penned a half dozen novels, the most famous of which, Amos Judd (1895), was made into the 1922 silent film, The Young Rajah, starring Rudolph Valentino. Life was purchased in 1936 by another Ridgefielder, Henry Luce (q.v.), who turned it into a picture magazine. The headquarters of Mitchell’s Life is now The Herald Square Hotel in New York, a gift to Mitchell from Charles Dana Gibson in appreciation of the publisher’s having seen and developed his potential as an artist. – more – http://jackfsanders.tripod.com/M-R.htm
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(3 ) Albert Levering (b. 1869 – d. 1929 age 60 in New York) was born in Hope, Indiana, the son of Levi L. Levering, a carpenter. The family later relocated to Kansas City, Missouri. Levering studied architecture and practiced that profession for eight years in San Antonio, Texas. He later abandoned architecture to become a newspaper artist. Levering worked for newspapers in Kansas City, Missouri as well as the Minneapolis Times and Chicago Tribune. In 1896 he moved to New York and worked on the staff of the New York Journal, Tribune and Herald-Tribune. He subsequently worked as a book and magazine illustrator on the staff of Puck, Life, Collier’s, and Cosmopolitan. By 1903 he had a regular full-page feature in Harper’s Weekly.
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Mark Twain’s “Italian Without a Master” appeared in Harper’s Weekly on January 2, 1904 with six illustrations by Albert Levering. The essay is the only one in The $30,000 Bequest and Other Stories that retains all of its original illustrations from the first printing (plus six photo reproductions of Italian newspaper headlines).
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In 1909 Levering drew the cover and frontispiece for Mark Twain’s short book Extract from Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven. – more -http://www.twainquotes.com/UniformEds/UniformEdsCh26.html – images –  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1909._Extract_from_Captain_Stormfield%27s_Visit_to_Heaven.djvu
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The Ernest Bell Library – more info – http://www.happycow.net/blog/?p=5665 
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thanks-giving
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About John Edmundson

Working to promote vegan businesses since 1978. Henry S. Salt Archive - researcher & fundraiser. The Humanitarian League - researcher & fundraiser. The Ernest Bell Library - archive manager. Collecting & republishing historical material of vegetarianism and other humanitarian movements. Running the 'Hum-an-imal Badge Co.'.
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